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Unique, educational and entertaining talks drawing on personal anecdotes

Emily Freeman

travels from USA

Developer advocate, former competitive power lifter and ghostwriter who switch careers into software engineering

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About Emily

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Keynote speaker Emily Freeman is an engaging and humorous presenter on a variety of topics ranging from software to management. A former competitive powerlifter and ghostwriter, Emily had a slightly-older-than-quarterlife crisis and made the bold jump to switch careers into software engineering.

Keynote speaker Emily Freeman’s story: With no experience at all in software development, Emily packed her six-month-old daughter, blind dog and a few boxes into her anti-mom mobile of a sports car and drove across the country to attend the Turing School of Software Development and Design in Denver. There, Emily completed seven grueling months of code reviews, pair programming and learning Ruby on Rails. After falling in love with Denver, a city as vibrant as she is, Emily decided to stay and currently works as a developer advocate at Kickbox. Speaker Emily Freeman is also the curator of javascriptjanuary.com — a collection of JavaScript articles which attracts 32,000 visitors in the month of January.

Speaker Emily Freeman is a creative and lively personality. She gives unique, educational and entertaining talks, drawing on anecdotes from her own life.

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    Keynote by Speaker Emily Freeman

    The Dr. Seuss Guide to Code Craftsmanship

    • I have a two-year-old daughter who adores Dr. Seuss. And as I was reading Cat in the Hat for the 214th time, I realized Dr. Seuss had it all figured out. His words are odd. The cadence confusing. But there’s a gem hidden in all his children’s rhymes.
    • You see, Dr. Seuss would have made an excellent engineer. Because great code isn’t about choosing the perfect method name or building out 95% test coverage. All that is great, but it doesn’t make great code. YOU DO.
    • It likely never feels that way. There’s a rhythm to software development that goes something like this: 1. “Easy. I’ve got this.” 2. “Uhhh, maybe not.” 3. “HALP! I have no idea what the f*ck I’m doing.” 4. “How did I not think of that before?!” 5. “I AM A GOD.”
    • This process is okay if you’re comfortable having a mild psychotic break every sprint. I’m not.
    • We’re going about it all wrong. Putting ourselves — our egos — above our code. No judgement. I do it too. We’re human. It’s okay. But I think we can bypass our egos and the emotional ups and downs it produces.
    • This talk will focus on common pitfalls along the development lifecycle and distill Dr. Seuss’s excellent advice into concise steps developers can take before they write a single line of code. In the words of Dr. Seuss: You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose. You’re on your own. And you know what you know. And YOU are the guy who’ll decide where to go.

     

    Keynote by Speaker Emily Freeman

    The Intelligence of Instinct

    • Sometimes fear isn’t life or death. Often, it’s code smell. It’s a bad feeling before a deploy. There are endless dark alleys in our codebases. This talk will explore fear, instinct and denial. We’ll focus on our two brains — what Daniel Kahneman describes as System 1 and System 2. And we’ll look at how we can start to view “feelings” as pre-incident indicators.

     

    Keynote by Speaker Emily Freeman

    Scaling Sparta: Military Lessons for Growing a Dev Team

    • Scaling systems is hard, but we’re developers — that’s kind of our thing. Scaling people? Well, that’s significantly harder. Humans are complicated.
    • How do you scale a team of two to twenty? The answer starts over 2,000 years ago in Sparta…
    • This talk will focus on three distinct military organizations: Spartans, Mongols and Romans. Sparta’s standing army numbered 10,000 whereas Rome’s peaked at half a million. We’ll look at the structure of each military and apply the lessons learned to our development teams and organizations.

     

    Other Keynotes by Speaker Emily Freeman

    • Impostor Syndrome
    • Technology
    • Company
    • Culture
    • Diversity
    • Management

     

Emily Freeman - video

Scaling Sparta: Military Lessons for Growing A Dev Team by speaker Emily Freeman

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Keynote topics with Emily Freeman